Learning Strategies for Students with Learning Disabilities

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Introduction

This bibliography has been developed to accompany NICHCY's News Digest called Interventions for Students with Learning Disabilities (1997). That News Digest focuses primarily upon the importance of teaching students with learning disabilities how to learn by teaching them how to use learning strategies.

Learning strategies are the tools and techniques we use to help ourselves understand and learn new material or skills, integrate this new information with what we already know in a way that makes sense, and recall the information or skill later, even in a different situation or place. Our strategies include what we think about (e.g., planning before writing, realizing when we are not understanding something we are reading, remembering what we have learned previously on the topic under study) and what we physically do (e.g., taking notes, re-reading to clear up confusion, making a chart, table, or story map to capture the most important information). Research has shown that using knowledge about learning strategies, including which strategies to use in different situations, can help make students more effective, purposeful, and independent learners.

While Interventions for Students with Learning Disabilities extensively described learning strategies and presented a well-researched model for teaching learning strategies to students, space did not permit an extensive discussion of the many and varied strategy interventions that have been developed and tested in classrooms across the last 15 years. So that teachers might easily access the depth and breadth of learning strategy knowledge that exists today, we have developed this bibliography. It provides a selected listing of articles and books available on the subject of learning strategies. Some of these materials present overviews of the entire field, from research to practice, while others are short, detailed descriptions of actual strategies taught to students in the classroom. The bibliography is divided into the following sections:

general strategy materials

strategies for studying, thinking, test-taking
strategies for reading
strategies for writing
strategies for math
strategies for science and other subjects
teaching social skills

These materials will help teachers select what strategies might be most useful to their students, given the types of classroom tasks they encounter or have difficulty with. Using the strategy instruction model presented in Interventions for Students with Learning Disabilities, teachers can then provide their students with explicit instruction in how to use the selected strategies.

There is an old saying: Catch a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach him to fish, and he'll eat for a lifetime. Teaching students to use learning strategies is akin to teaching them to fish. With the great gift of knowledge, they are then capable of learning independently their entire life.

General Strategy Materials

Boyle, J.R., & Yeager, N. (1997, March/April). Blueprints for learning: Using cognitive frameworks for understanding. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 29(4), 26-31.

Cramer, S.C.C., & Ellis, W. (Eds.). (1996). Learning disabilities: Lifelong issues. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.

Deshler, D.D., Ellis, E.S., & Lenz, B.K. (1996). Teaching adolescents with learning disabilities: Strategies and methods (2nd ed.). Denver, CO: Love.

Deshler, D.D., & Schumaker, J.B. (1993, November). Strategy mastery by at-risk students: Not a simple matter. Elementary School Journal, 94(2), 153-167.

Dohrn, E., & Bryan, T. (1994, Summer). Attribution instruction. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 26(4), 61-63.

Duchardt, B.A. (1995, Summer). A strategic intervention for enabling students with learning disabilities to identify and change their ineffective beliefs. Learning Disabilitiy Quarterly, 18(3), 186-201.

Ellis, E.S. (1993, June-July). Integrative strategy instruction: A potential model for teaching content area subjects to adolescents with learning disabilities. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 26(6), 358-383, 398.

Ellis, E., Deshler, D.D., Lenz, B.K., Schumaker, J.B., & Clark, F. (1991). An instructional model for teaching learning strategies. Focus on Exceptional Children, 23(6), 1-24.

Gaskins, I.W. (1991). Implementing cognitive strategy instruction across the school: The Benchmark manual for teachers. Cambridge, MA: Brookline.

Graham, S., Harris, K.R., & Reid, R. (1992). Developing self-regulated learners. Focus on Exceptional Children, 24(6), 1-16.

Harris, K.R., Graham, S., & Deshler, D. (Eds.). (in press). Teaching every child every day: Integrated learning in diverse classrooms. Cambridge, MA: Brookline.

Harris, K.R., & Schmidt, T. (1997, April). Learning self-regulation in the classroom. The ADHD Report, 5(2), 1-6.

Hogan K., & Pressley, M. (Eds.). (1997). Scaffolding student learning: Instructional approaches and issues. Cambridge, MA: Brookline.

Howard, J.B. (1994, Spring). Addressing needs through strengths: Five instructional practices for use with gifted/learning disabled students. Journal of Secondary Gifted Education, 5(3), 23-34.

Hudson, P. (1993, Spring). Using content enhancements to improve the performance of adolescents with learning disabilities in content classes. Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, 8(2), 106-126.

Kagan, S. (1992). The structural approach to cooperative learning. Educational Leadership, 47(4), 12-16.

Lenz, B.K., Ellis, E.S., & Scanlon, D. (1996). Teaching learning strategies to adolescents and adults with learning disabilities. Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.

Lerner, J. (1997). Learning disabilities: Theories, diagnosis, and teaching strategies (7th ed.). Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.

MacArthur, C.A., Schwartz, S.S., Graham, S., Molloy, D., & Harris, K. (1996). Integration of strategy instruction into a whole language classroom: A case study. Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, 11(3), 168-176.

Marks, J.W., Van Laeys, J., Bender, W.N., & Scott, K.S. (1996, Summer). Teachers create learning strategies: Guidelines for classroom creation. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 28(4), 34-38.

Mastropieri, M.A. (1991). Teaching students ways to remember: Strategies for learning mnemonically. Cambridge, MA: Brookline.

Meichenbaum, D., & Biemiller, A. (in press). Nurturing independent learners: Helpings students take charge of their learning. Cambridge, MA: Brookline.

Meltzer, L.J. (Ed.). (1993). Strategy assessment and instruction for students with learning disabilities: From theory to practice. Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.

Mercer, C.D. (1997). Students with learning disabilities. Columbus, OH: Merrill.

Notari-Syverson, A.R., Cole, K., Osborn, J.L., & Sherwood, D. (1996). What is this? What did we just do? How did you do that? Teaching cognitive and social strategies to young children with disabilities in integrated settings. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 28(2), 12-17.

Olivier, C. (1996). Learning to learn. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster.

Pressley, M., & Woloshyn, V.E. (Eds.). (1995). Cognitive strategy instruction that really improves children's academic performance (2nd ed.). Cambridge, MA: Brookline.

Rankin, J.L., & Reid, R. (1995, January). The SM Rap--Or, here's the rap on self-monitoring. Intervention in School and Clinic, 30(3), 181-188.

Reid, R. (1996, May). Research in self-monitoring with students with learning disabilities: The present, the prospects, the pitfalls. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 29(3), 317-331.

Reid, D.K., Hresko, W.P., & Swanson, H.L. (1996). Cognitive approaches to learning disabilities (3rd ed.). Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.

Reid, D.K., & Stone, C.A. (1991). Why is cognitive instruction effective? Underlying learning mechanisms. Remedial and Special Education, 12(3), 8-19.

Rogan, J. (1995, Spring). Facilitating inclusion: The role of learning strategies to support secondary students with special needs. Preventing School Failure, 39(3), 35-39.

Sawyer, R., Graham, S., & Harris, K.R. (1992). Direct teaching, strategy instruction, and strategy instruction with explicit self-regulation: Effects on learning disabled students' compositions and self-efficacy. Journal of Educational Psychology, 84, 340-352.

Scheid, K. (1993). Helping students become strategic learners: Guidelines for teaching. Cambridge, MA: Brookline.

Schumaker, J.B., & Deshler, D.D. (1992). Validation of learning strategy interventions for students with LD: Results of a programmatic research effort. In B.Y.L. Wong (Ed.), Contemporary intervention research in learning disabilities: An international perspective (pp. 22-46). New York: Springer-Verlag.

Schunk, D., & Zimmerman, B. (1994). Self-regulation of learning and performance: Issues and educational applications. New York: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Topping, K.J. (1988). The peer tutoring handbook: Promoting co-operative learning. Cambridge, MA: Brookline.

Vogel, S. A. (Ed.). (1992). Educational alternatives for students with learning disabilities. New York: Springer-Verlag.

Wong, B.Y.L. (1996). The ABCs of learning disabilities. New York, NY: Academic Press.

Wood, E., Woloshyn, V.E., & Willoughby, T. (1995). Cognitive strategy instruction for middle and high schools. Cambridge, MA: Brookline.

Obtaining the Books That Interest You

To help you obtain the books that interest you, we've listed the addresses and telephone numbers of publishers at the end of this document. The publisher's name generally appears in the final position in the citation -- to illustrate, it appears in bold in this example citation:

Deshler, D.D., Ellis, E.S., & Lenz, B.K. (1996). Teaching adolescents with learning disabilities: Strategies and methods (2nd ed.). Denver, CO: Love.

If the word Author appears in the publisher position, this means that the publisher and the author are one and the same. Look at the author's name, find this name in the List of Publishers, and use the contact information provided.

Strategies for Studying, Thinking, & Test-Taking

Brigham, F.J. (1993, April). Places, spaces, and memory traces: Showing students with learning disabilities ways to remember locations and events on maps. Paper presented at the annual conference of the Council for Exceptional Children, San Antonio, TX. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 357 558)

Brigham, F.J. (1995, Winter). Elaborative maps for enhanced learning of historical information: Uniting spatial, verbal, and imaginal information. Journal of Special Education, 28(4), 440-460.

Crank, J., & Bulgren, J.A. (1993). Visual depictions as information organizers for enhancing the achievement of students with learning disabilities. Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, 8, 140-147.

Evers, R.B., & Bursuck, W.D. (1995, Summer). Helping students succeed in technical classes: Using learning strategies and study skills. TEACHING Exceptional Students, 27(4), 22-27.

Fulk, B.M. (1994). Mnemonic keyword strategy training for students with learning disabilities. Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, 9(3), 179-185.

Heaton, S., & O'Shea, D.J. (1995, Fall). Using mnemonics to make mnemonics. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 28(1), 34-36.

Hoover, J.J., & Patton, J.R. (1995). Teaching students with learning problems to use study skills: A teacher's guide. Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.

Hughes, C.A., & Suritsky, S.K. (1993, Fall). Notetaking skills and strategies for students with learning disabilities. Preventing School Failure, 38(1), 7-11.

Kennedy, C., Van Nagel, C., & Lovett, M. (1994, April). Study strategies: A formula for exceptional outcomes in the mainstream. Paper presented at the annual conference of the Council for Exceptional Children, Denver, CO. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 373 461)

Lazarus, B.D. (1996, Spring). Flexible skeletons: Guided notes for adolescents with mild disabilities. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 28(3), 36-40.

Luckie, R., & Smethurst, W. (in press). Study power: Study skills to improve your learning and your grades. Cambridge, MA: Brookline.

Mangrum II, C.T. Learning to study (2nd ed.). Cambridge, MA: Brookline. [This six-book series begins on grade level 2/3 and extends through grade level 8.]

Mastropieri, M., & Scruggs, T. (1991). Teaching students ways to remember: Strategies for learning mnemonically. Cambridge, MA: Brookline.

Rich, R.Z., & Blake, S. (1995, Winter). Collaborative questioning: Fostering the self-regulated learner. LD Forum, 20(2), 38-40.

Scanlon, D., Deshler, D.D., & Schumaker, J.B. (1996). Can a strategy be taught and learned in secondary inclusive classrooms? Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, 11, 41-57.

Scruggs, T.E., & Mastropieri, M. (1991-92, December-January). Classroom applications of mnemonic instruction: Acquisition, maintenance, and generalization. Exceptional Children, 58(3), 219-229.

Scruggs, T., & Mastropieri, M. (1992). Teaching test taking skills: Helping students show what they know. Cambridge, MA: Brookline.

Scruggs, T.E., & Wong, B.Y.L. (Eds.). (1990). Intervention research in learning disabilities. New York: Springer-Verlag.

Strichart, S.S., & Mangrum, C.T. (1993). Teaching study strategies to students with learning disabilities. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

ERIC Documents

Some of the documents listed in this bibliography are available through the ERIC system. You can tell these documents by the ED number that follows their citation -- for example, ED 372 573. If you have access to a university or library that has the ERIC collection on microfiche, you may be able to read and photocopy the document there. If not, contact the ERIC Document Reproduction Service (EDRS), at the address listed under Publishers. Give EDRS the ED number; for a nominal fee, you will receive a copy of the document.

Strategies for Reading

Blachowicz, C.L.Z. (1991, October-December). Vocabulary instruction in content classes for special needs learners: Why and how? Journal of Reading, Writing, and Learning Disabilities International, 7(4), 297-308.

Bos, C.S., & Anders, P.L. (1990). Toward an interactive model: Teaching text-based concepts to learning disabled students. In H.L. Swanson & B. Keogh (Eds.), Learning disabilities: Theoretical and research issues (pp. 247-261). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Bos, C.S., & Anders, P.L. (1992). Using interactive teaching and learning strategies to promote text comprehension and content learning for students with learning disabilities. International Journal of Disability, Development, and Education, 39(3), 225-238.

Ciborowski, J. (1993). Textbooks and the students who can't read them: A guide for the teaching of content. Cambridge, MA: Brookline.

Dimino, J.A., Taylor, R.M., & Gersten, R.M. (1995). Synthesis of the research on story grammar as a means to increase comprehension. Reading and Writing Quarterly: Overcoming Learning Difficulties, 11(1), 53-72.

Dixon, M.E., & Rossi, J.C. (1995, Winter). Directors of their own learning: A reading strategy for students with learning disabilities. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 27(2), 10-14.

ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education. (1996, Spring). Beginning reading and phonological awareness for students with learning disabilities. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 28(3), 78-79. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 392 197)

Gaskins, I., & Elliot, T. (1991). Implementing cognitive strategy instruction across the school: The Benchmark manual for teachers. Cambridge, MA: Brookline.

Gunning, T. (1995). Learning to read and think. Cambridge, MA: Brookline.

Hagood, B.F. (1997, March/April). Reading and writing with help from story grammar. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 29(4), 10-14.

Johnson, L.A., Graham, S., & Harris, K.R. (1997, January/February). The effects of goal setting and self-instruction on learning a reading comprehension strategy: A study of students with learning disabilities. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 30(1), 80-91.

Malone, L.D., & Mastropieri, M.A. (1991-2, December-January). Reading comprehension instruction: Summarization and self-monitoring training for students with learning disabilities. Exceptional Children, 58(3), 270-279.

Orton Dyslexia Society. (1997). Informal instruction for reading success: Foundations for teacher preparation. A position paper of the Orton Dyslexia Society, Baltimore, MD.

Palincsar, A.M., & Brown, A. (1984). Reciprocal teaching of comprehension fostering and comprehension monitoring strategies. Cognition and Instruction, 1, 117-175.

Pressley, M. (1989, September). Strategies that improve children's memory and comprehension of text. Elementary School Journal, 90(1), 3-32.

Pressley, M. (1995). The comprehension instruction that students need: Instruction fostering constructively responsive reading. Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, 10(4), 215-224.

Rich, R.Z., & Blake, S. (1994). Using pictures to assist in comprehension and recall. Intervention in School and Clinic, 29(5), 271-275.

Rottman, T.R., & Cross, D.R. (1990). Using informed strategies for learning to enhance the reading and thinking skills of children with learning disabilities. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 23, 270-278.

Scanlon, D.J., Duran, G.Z., Reyes, E.I., & Gallego, M.A. (1991). Interactive semantic mapping: An interactive approach to enhancing LD students' content area comprehension. Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, 7, 142-146.

Thompson, K.L., & Taymans, J.M. (1994, September). Development of a reading strategies program: Bridging the gaps among decoding, literature, and thinking skills. Intervention in School and Clinic, 30(1), 17-27.

Strategies for Writing

Buchan, L. (1996, Winter). Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles counting pizza toppings: A creative writing learning strategy. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 28(2), 40-43.

Collins, J.L., & Collins, K.M. (1994, November). When process writing fails: Strategy instruction for nonmainstream writers. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Council of Teachers of English, Orlando, FL. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 379 656)

Danoff, B. (1993). Incorporating strategy instruction within the writing process in the regular classroom: Effects on the writing of students with and without learning disabilities. Journal of Reading Behavior, 25(3), 295-322.

Ellis, E. (1994). Integrating writing strategy instruction with content-area instruction, Part I--Orienting students to organizational devices. Intervention in School and Clinic, 29, 169-179.

Englert, C.S., Raphael, T.E., Anderson, L.M., Anthony, H.M., & Stevens, D.D. (1991). Making strategies and self-talk visible: Writing instruction in regular and special education classrooms. American Educational Research Journal, 28(2), 337-372.

First, C.G. (1995, September). Writing process versatility. Intervention in School and Clinic, 31(1), 21-27.

Fulk, B.M. (1997, March/April). Think while you spell: A cognitive motivational approach to spelling instruction. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 29(4), 70-71.

Fulk, B.M., & Stormont-Spurgin, M. (1995, September). Fourteen spelling strategies for students with learning disabilities. Intervention in School and Clinic, 31(1), 16-20.

Fulk, B.M., & Stormont-Spurgin, M. (1995, Winter). Spelling interventions for students with disabilities: A review. Journal of Special Education, 28(4), 488-513.

Gaskins, J.C. (1995, May). Teaching writing to students with learning disabilities: The Landmark method. Teaching English in the Two-Year College, 22(2), 116-122.

Graham, S. (1992, February). Improving the compositions of students with learning disabilities using a strategy involving product and process goal setting. Exceptional Children, 58(4), 322-334.

Graham, S., & Harris, K.R. (1993). Self-regulated strategy development: Helping students with learning problems develop as writers. Elementary School Journal, 94(2), 169-179.

Graham, S., & Harris, K.R. (1996). Teaching writing strategies within the context of a whole language class. In E. McIntyre & M. Pressley (Eds.), Balanced instruction: Strategies and skills in whole language (pp. 155-175). New York, NY: Christopher-Gordon.

Graham, S., Harris, K.R., MacArthur, C., & Schwartz, S. (1991). Writing and writing instruction with students with learning disabilities: A review of a program of research. Learning Disabilities Quarterly, 14, 89-114.

Hagood, B.F. (1997, March/April). Reading and writing with help from story grammar. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 29(4), 10-14.

Hallenback, M.J. (1996). The cognitive strategy in writing: Welcome relief for adolescents with learning disabilities. Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, 11(2), 107-119.

Harris, K.R., & Graham, S. (1996). Making the writing process work: Strategies for composition and self-regulation. Cambridge, MA: Brookline.

Korinek, L., & Bulls, J.A. (1996, Summer). SCORE A: A student research paper writing strategy. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 28(4), 60-63.

MacArthur, C.A. (1994, Fall). Peers + word processing + strategies = A powerful combination for revising student writing. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 27(1), 24-29.

MacArthur, C.A. (1995, Fall). Evaluation of a writing instruction model that integrated a process approach, strategy instruction, and word processing. Learning Disabilities Quarterly, 18(4), 278-291.

Milem, M., & Garcia, M. (1996, Spring). Student critics, teacher models: Introducing process writing to high school students with learning disabilities. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 28(3), 46-47.

Ormrod, J.E., & Jenkens, L. (1988, April). Study strategies for learning spelling: What works and what does not. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, LA. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 293 871)

Sexton, M., Harris, K.R., & Graham, S. (in press). The effects of self-regulated strategy development on essay writing and attributions of students with LD in a process writing setting. Exceptional Children.

Shannon, T.R., & Polloway, E.A. (1993). Promoting error monitoring in middle school students with LD. Intervention in School and Clinic, 27, 160-164.

Stevens, D.D., & Englert, S.C. (1993). Making writing strategies work. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 26(1), 34-39.

Welch, M. (1992, Spring). The PLEASE strategy: A metacognitive learning strategy for improving the paragraph writing of students with mild learning disabilities. Learning Disabilities Quarterly, 15(2), 119-128.

Wills, H. (1993). Writing is learning: Strategies for math, science, social studies, and language arts. Bloomington, IN: EDINFO Press.

Wong, B.Y.L. (1996, March). Teaching low achievers and students with learning disabilities to plan, write, and revise opinion essays. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 29(2), 197-212.

Wong, B., Butler, D., Ficzere, S., Kuperis, S., Corden, M., & Zelmer, J. (1994). Teaching problem learners revision skills and sensitivity to audience through two instructional modes: Student-teacher versus student-student interactive dialogues. Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, 9, 78-90.

Zipprich, M.A. (1995, January). Teaching web making as a guided planning tool to improve student narrative writing. Remedial and Special Education, 16(1), 3-15, 52.

Obtaining Journal Articles That Interest You
Journal articles may be available at a local university or college, local library, or a local professional teachers' library, if the journal in question is part of that institution's collection. If not, you'll need to contact the journal publisher directly to inquire about their duplication policies. Some publishers handle this activity themselves; others will refer you to University Microfilms International (UMI)--located at 300 N. Zeeb Road, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346; telephone: 1-800-248-0360; web: www.umi.com-- or to the Copyright Clearance Center -- located at 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923; telephone: (508) 750-8400; web: www.copyright.com/.

Strategies for Mathematics

Bley, N.S., & Thornton, C.A. (1994). Teaching mathematics to students with learning disabilities (3rd ed.). Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.

Brigham, F.J., Wilson, R., Jones, E., & Moisio, M. (1996, Spring). Best practices: Teaching decimals, fractions, and percents to students with learning disabilities. LD Forum, 21(3), 10-15.

Case, L.P. (1992, Spring). Improving the mathematical problem-solving skills of students with learning disabilities: Self-regulated strategy development. Journal of Special Education, 26(1), 1-19.

Chinn, S.J., & Ashcroft, J.R. (1993). Mathematics for dyslexics: A teaching handbook. San Diego, CA: Singular. [A new edition of this book is scheduled for release in September 1997.]

Cooper, R. (1994). Alternative math techniques instructional guide. Bryn Mawr, PA: Center for Alternative Learning. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 376 355)

Corral, N., & Antia, S.D. (1997, March/April). Self talk: Strategies for success in math. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 29(4), 42-45.

Dunn, C., & Rabren, K. (1996, Spring). Functional mathematics instruction to prepare students for adulthood. LD Forum, 21(3), 34-40.

Jitendra, A., & Xin, Y.P. (1997, Winter). Mathematical word-problem-solving instruction for students with mild disabilities and students at risk for math failure: A research synthesis. Journal of Special Education, 30(4), 412-438.

Kelly, B., & Carnine, D. (1996, Spring). Teaching problem-solving strategies for word problems to students with learning disabilities. LD Forum, 21(3), 5-9.

Lambert, M.A. (1996, Winter). Mathematics textbooks, materials, and manipulatives. LD Forum, 21(2), 41-45.

Lock, R.H. (1996, Winter). Adapting mathematics instruction in the general education classroom for students with mathematics disabilities. LD Forum, 21(2), 19-23.

Miles, D.D., & Forcht, J.P. (1995, November). Mathematics strategies for secondary students with learning disabilities or mathematics deficiencies: A cognitive approach. Intervention in School and Clinic, 31(2), 91-96.

Miller, A.D., Barbetta, P.M., Drevno, G.E., Martz, S.A., & Heron, T.E. (1996, Spring). Math peer tutoring for students with specific learning disabilities. LD Forum, 21(3), 21-28.

Miller, S.P., & Mercer, C.D. (1993, November). Mnemonics: Enhancing the math performance of students with learning disabilities. Intervention in School and Clinic, 29(2), 78-82.

Miller, S.P., Strawser, S., & Mercer, C.D. (1996, Winter). Promoting strategic math performance among students with learning disabilities. LD Forum, 21(2), 34-40.

Montague, M. (1993). Cognitive strategy instruction and mathematical problem-solving performance of students with learning disabilities. Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, 8(4), 223-232.

Montague, M. (1995, Spring). Cognitive instruction and mathematics: Implications for students with learning disabilities. Focus on Learning Problems in Mathematics, 17(2), 39-49.

Rivera, D.P. (Ed.). (1996, Winter). Teaching math to students with learning disabilities: Part I [Special issue]. LD Forum, 21(2).

Rivera, D.P. (Ed.). (1996a, Spring). Teaching math to students with learning disabilities: Part II [Special issue]. LD Forum, 21(3).

Rivera, D.P. (1996b, Spring). Using cooperative learning to teach mathematics to students with learning disabilities. LD Forum, 21(3), 29-33.

Salend, S.J., & Hofstetter, E. (1996, March). Adapting a problem-solving approach to teaching mathematics to students with mild disabilities. Intervention in School and Clinic, 31(4), 209-217.

Scott, P.B., & Raborn, D.T. (1996, Winter). Realizing the gifts of diversity among students with learning disabilities. LD Forum, 21(2), 10-18

Strategies for Science and Other Subjects

Barnett, H., & Jarvis-Sladky, K. (1995, March). Learning disabilities: Teaching and reaching all learners. Hispania, 78(1), 163-166.

Brigham, F.J. (1995, Winter). Elaborative maps for enhanced learning of historical information: Uniting spatial, verbal, and imaginal information. Journal of Special Education, 28(4), 440-460.

Guerin, G.R. (1992). Improving instruction for students at risk: Using history-social science textbooks. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Education. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 357 583)

Kataoka, J.C., & Lock, R. (1995, Summer). Whales and hermit crabs: Integrated programming and science. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 27(4), 17-21.

Kucera, T.J. (Ed.). (1993). Teaching chemistry to students with disabilities (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: American Chemical Society. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 383 131)

Letendre, W. (1993, Spring). Mnemonic instruction with regular and special students in social studies. Southern Social Studies Journal, 18(2), 25-37.

Lovitt, T.C., & Horton, S.V. (1994, March). Strategies for adapting science textbooks for youth with learning disabilities. Remedial and Special Education, 15(2), 105-116.

Norman, K., & Caseau, D. (1995, Spring). The learning cycle: Teaching to the strengths of students with learning disabilities in science classrooms. Journal of Science for Persons with Disabilities, 3(1), 18-25.

Scruggs, T.E., & Mastropieri, M.A. (1993). Current approaches to science education: Implication for mainstream instruction of students with disabilities. Remedial and Special Education, 14(1), 15-24.

Stefanich, G.P., & Egelston-Dodd, J. (Eds.). (1995). Improving science instruction for students with disabilities. Proceedings of the Working Conference on Science for Persons with Disabilities, Anaheim, CA. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 399 724)

SIM Products

The Strategies Integration Model (SIM) was extensively described in the NICHCY News Digest called Interventions for Students with Learning Disabilities. Many strategy intervention materials and videos are available from the University of Kansas, whose researchers developed the SIM. These materials will help teachers develop their students' use of learning strategies in reading, writing, math, and other academic areas. Some may only be purchased in conjunction with training in the SIM model.

To learn what SIM materials and videos are available, contact either:

Center for Research on Learning
University of Kansas 3061 Dole Center Lawrence, KS 66045 Telephone: (785) 864-4780

Edge Enterprises
P.O. Box 1304 Lawrence, KS 66044
Telephone: (785) 749-1473

Teaching Social Skills

Bedell, J.R. (1997). Handbook for communication and problem-solving skills training: A cognitive-behavioral approach. New York: Wiley.

Bender, W.N. (1994, Fall). Social-emotional development: The task and the challenge. Learning Disability Quarterly, 17(4), 250-252.

Brown, B.P. (1995, May). A homogeneous group approach to social skills training for individuals with learning disabilities. Journal for Specialists in Group Work, 20(2), 98-107.

Conte, R. (1995, March). A classroom-based social skills intervention for children with learning disabilities. Alberta Journal of Educational Research, 41(1), 84-102.

Elias, M.J. (1996). Social problem solving: Interventions in the schools. New York, NY: Guilford.

Elksnin, L.K. (1994, Fall). Promoting generalization of social skills. LD Forum, 20(1), 35-37.

Elksnin, L.K., & Elksnin, N. (1995, Summer). Teaching social skills to students with learning disabilities. LD Forum, 20(4), 16-19.

Forness, S.R., & Kavale, K.A. (1996). Treating social skill deficits in children with learning disabilities: A meta-analysis of the research. Learning Disabilities Quarterly, 19, 2-13.

Geller, E.S. (Ed.). (1992). Improving social competence [Special issue]. Journal of Applied Behavioral Analysis, 25.

Goldstein, A.P. (1988). The Prepare curriculum: Teaching prosocial competencies. Champaign, IL: Research Press.

Knapczyk, D.R. (1996). Teaching social competence: A practical approach for improving social skills in students at-risk. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Lavoie, R. (n.d.). Learning disabilities and social skills with Richard Lavoie--Last one picked...first one picked on [video & guide]. Alexandria, VA: PBS Video.

McIntosh, R. (1995, Fall). FAST social skills with a SLAM and a RAP: Providing social skills training for students with learning disabilities. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 28(1), 37-41.

National Center for Learning Disabilities. (n.d.). Information packet on social skills and self-esteem. New York, NY: Author.

Osman, B.B., & Blinder, H. (1995). No one to play with: The social problems of LD and ADD children. Novato, CA: Academic Therapy Press.

Richardson, R.C. (1996). Connecting with others: Lessons for teaching social and emotional competence. Champaign, IL: Research Press. (This resource comes in two versions: one for K-2, and one for grades 3-5.)

Riches, V.C. (1996). Everyday social interaction: A program for people with disabilities. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.

Rosenthal-Malek, A.L. (1997, January/February). Stop and think! Using metacognitive strategies to teach students social skills. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 29(3), 29-31.

Schumaker, J.B., Hazel, J.S., & Pederson, C.S. (n.d.). Social skills for daily living. Circle Pines, MN: AGS.

Smith, J.O. (1995, Fall). Getting to the bottom of social skills deficits. LD Forum, 21(1), 23-26.

Washington, C.W. (Ed.). (1995, Summer). Social skills issues. LINKAGES, 2(2), 1-16. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 387 995)

List of Publishers

Academic Press, 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, FL 32887. Telephone: 1-800-831-7799.

Academic Therapy Press, 20 Commercial Boulevard, Novato, CA 94949. Telephone: 1-800-422-7249 (outside CA); (415) 883-3314.

AGS, 4201 Woodland Road, P.O. Box 99, Circle Pines, MN 55014-1796. Telephone: 1-800-328-2560.

Allyn and Bacon, Order Processing Center, P.O. Box 11071, Des Moines, IA 50336-1071. Telephone: 1-800-947-7700.

Brookline Books, P.O. Box 1047, Cambridge, MA 02238. Telephone: 1-800-666-2665; (617) 868-0360.

Brooks/Cole, ITP Distribution Center, 7625 Empire Drive, Florence, KY 41042. Telephone: 1-800-347-7707.

Christopher-Gordon, 480 Washington Street, Norwood, MA 02062. Telephone: 1-800-934-8322; (617) 762-5577.

EDINFO Press, c/o Grayson Bernard Publications, P.O. Box 5247, Bloomington, IN 47407. Telephone: 1-800-925-7853; (812) 331-8182.

ERIC Document Reproduction Service, CBIS Federal, Inc., 7420 Fullerton Road, Suite 110, Springfield, VA 22153-2852. Telephone: 1-800-443-3742; (703) 440-1400.

Guilford, 72 Spring Street, New York, NY 10012. Telephone: 1-800-365-7006.

Houghton Mifflin, 181 Ballardbale Street, Wilmington, MA 01887. Telephone: 1-800-225-3362; (508) 661-1300.

Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 10 Industrial Avenue, Mahwah, NJ 07430-2262. Telephone: 1-800-926-6579 (orders); (201) 236-9500.

Love Publishing Company, P.O. Box 22353, Denver, CO 80222. Telephone: (303) 757-2579.

Merrill, see Allyn and Bacon.

National Center for Learning Disabilities, 381 Park Avenue South, Suite 1401, New York, NY 10016. Telephone: 1-888-575-7373.

NICHCY, P.O. Box 1492, Washington, DC 20013. Telephone: 1-800-695-0285.

Orton Dyslexia Society, Chester Building #382, 8600 LaSalle Road, Baltimore, MD 21286-2044. Telephone: 1-800-222-3123; (410) 296-0232. Web site: http://www.ods.org

Paul H. Brookes, P.O. Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21286-0624. Telephone: 1-800-638-3775.

PBS Video, 1320 Braddock Place, Alexandria, VA 22314-1698. Telephone: 1-800-344-3337.

Pro-Ed, 8700 Shoal Creek Boulevard, Austin, TX 78757. Telephone: 1-800-897-3202; (512) 451-3246.

Research Press, 2612 North Mattis Avenue, Champaign, IL 61821. Telephone: (217) 352-3273.

Simon and Schuster, Order Department, 200 Old Tappan Road, Old Tappan, NJ 07675. Telephone: 1-800-223-2336 (orders); (212) 698-7000.

Singular Publishing Group, 401 West A Street, Suite 325, San Diego, CA 92101-7904. Telephone: 1-800-521-8545; (619) 238-6777.

Springer-Verlag, Attention: Order Department, 44 Hartz Way, Secaucus, NJ 07094. Telephone: 1-800-777-4643; (201) 348-4033.

Wiley, Orders to: Eastern Distribution Center, 1 Wiley Drive, Somerset, NJ 08875-1272. Telephone: 1-800-225-5945, ext. 2497.

This information is copyright free. Readers are encouraged to copy and share it, but please credit the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities (NICHCY). NICHCY Resource Lists are published several times a year in response to questions from individuals and organizations that contact us. We encourage you to share your ideas and feedback with us!

Project Director: Suzanne Ripley
Editor/Compiler: Lisa Küpper
Associate Editor: Mary Kate Conroy

NICHCY welcomes Dr. Peggy Cvach as our Project Officer at the Office of Special Education Programs, U.S. Department of Education.
Publication of this document is made possible through a Cooperative Agreement between the Academy for Educational Development and the Office of Special Education Programs of the U.S. Department of Education. The contents of this document do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Education, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. NICHCY P.O. Box 1492 Washington, DC 20013 (800) 695-0285 · v/tty (202) 884-8441 · fax
nichcy@aed.org www.nichcy.org

A publication of the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities
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